A Morning in Grey Box Forest

Long time readers will no doubt recall that I often claim to have Grey Box sap running in my veins.

These amazing old trees are the superstructure for the type of forest and forest birds that I really enjoy working with. And as Woodlands Historic Park has such an untouched stand of Grey Box, its not hard to see why I love it as I practically learned my forest birds craft out there.

Another find stand of Grey Box is at Eynesbury near Melton.

Every second month the local Eynesbury Environmental Group, here’s their facebook page, conducts a morning walk in the forest for interested locals and visitors.
Chris Lunardi does a super job of getting us out in to the forest to look at some of the lesser visited areas and to find interesting birds.

Chris also seems to have an amazing ability to chose days where the weather is kind. And this past Sunday was no exception.

Probably the highlights of the day were a pair of very vocal Peregrine Falcon, and several sightings of  Diamond Firetails.
Diamond Firetails often are found around the lawns and golf greens in good numbers, and occasionally a few birds through the bush.  We managed to find them in 4 locations throughout the day.

Here’s a visual summary.

Brown Treecreeper
1909-29_DWJ_9626
Tree Martin hard at work collecting mud
Superb Fairywren defending his terrritory
Peregrine Falcon
A Good News story. Maned Duck family out for a stroll.
Sulpher-crested Cockatoo.
Always a favourite at Eynesbury. Jacky WInter.
Summer visitors are strarting to arrive.
Dusky Woodswallow
Signature Bird: Diamond Firetail.

 

 

A Day at Eynesbury

My mate Chris L, he of Mt Rothwell, and formerly Western Treatment Plant, fame has established a monthly bird walk around the Eynesbury Grey Box Forest.
It is a pretty informal arrangement, no signing of paper and turning up is about the only requirement.

“Are you interested in coming on Sunday?”, he said. Hmm. Didn’t really have to consult the diary. “Be there at 10 of the clock,” says he.
And so EE and I hit the road to Eynesbury in some brilliant sunshine.  When Chris organises a day, well, he organises the weather too.

By start time, about half a dozen locals, and Geraldine from Werribee Wagtails  – Now BirdLife Werribee, turned up.   Chris really wants to make it an opportunity for the local residents to enjoy the forest around their village.

Eynesbury is built around a golf course (well not really, but on the other hand, really). Another golfing friend, took a trip out there one day, saw the greens, and the area, and was back the following day to sign up for a villa.  Nothing like a game of golf that starts from your front step.

Surrounding the man-made, is the indomitable Grey Box. This is one of the largest stand of Grey Box left in Victoria. Something the locals are particularly proud of, and with every right.

We set off along the track that leads around the ornamental lake. Lake being a somewhat strange term at the moment as the dry weather has reduced it to a series of water holes.  And a home now for a number of Black-fronted Dotterels, among the usual ducks and other waders.  The cormorant families have had to move on.

A trip around the lake led us off into the wilds of suburbia as we walked along a track between the forest and the residences.   Many little bush birds, particularly Superb Fairy-wrens along here. It seemed that there was about one Fairy-wren clan to every front yard.

Across a dry creek and into the forest proper and the call of Brown Treecreepers announced our presence.  Then a Jacky Winter couple, and the familiar call of Diamond Firetails, but search as we might we didn’t spot them today.

A bit of ramble through the thickets between the Grey Box and we were nearing the end of our morning.  When a call of an Crested Shrike-tit echoed across the open area.  After quite a bit of searching, I’d concluded we’d missed it, and a cuppa beckoned.
Not so Christo. With stoic patience he continued, and a “Here it is!” was really a grand statement of his birding skills.  The group hurried to see. And not only one, but two  and working very close to the track and unperturbed by our presence.
The photographers were in for a treat and we were shown the skills needed to both track down and extract grubs from the most unlikely places among the bark.

And all too soon we were back in the carpark, and farewelling the lovely area.

Thanks Chris, we enjoyed the day.

Our first Jacky Winter for the day.  It gave the photographers a chance for a close approach
Our first Jacky Winter for the day. It gave the photographers a chance for a close approach
Jacky Winter. Always a fine pose
Jacky Winter. Always a fine pose
Intent of extracting a meal
Intent of extracting a meal
Eastern Shrike-tit on a twisted piece of bark.  A great find for our Guide.
Crested Shrike-tit on a twisted piece of bark. A great find for our Guide.
Eastern Shrike-tit
Crested Shrike-tit
Jacky WInter on blue
Jacky WInter on blue
When I was a little bloke, these were called "Grass Parrots".  Not so here.
When I was a little bloke, these were called “Grass Parrots”. Not so here.
Tree Martin on the wing
Tree Martin on the wing
No room on the branch
No room on the branch
Varied Stittella
Varied Stittella
A Brown Treecreeper wishing us good bye
A Brown Treecreeper wishing us good bye

 

 

A Day in Grey

Astute reader that you are, you’ll have recalled that the last posting here was a trip to Eynesbury for a visit to some Woodswallows at Nursery.

Decided on a whim today, to take another trip to the same spot not that we expected to find the Woodswallows still on nest,  but y’know, perhaps we might be lucky.

Well time, tide and Woodswallow fledglings wait for no photographer, and they had indeed taken to wing. Now of course it was a new challenge.

But there is something relaxing indeed about a pot of tea, (Earl Grey- see the connection?)  in a Grey Box forest.  So we sat.  And slowly the forest began to reveal those hidden secrets.

Over there, Tree Martins, still feeding young.  On the other side a pair of Rufous Whistlers who entertained with their calls.  More Brown Treecreepers than you can count, and most of them either at nest, or ferrying food for demanding young.

And my favourite find. Jacky Winter. The pair near out sit spot had two young and were keeping them up in the tops of the trees, but we still had enjoyable encounters.

Off to look for Matilda the Pacific-black Duck who has taken over a hollow, and to my surprise, she was still domicile, but only her carefully crafted wing tip feathers were showing her presence.  Must be close for her now.  I’ve no idea where she is going to lead them to water, but the nearest must be about 2km away through the scrub.

In the same area, lo and behold a second pair of Jacky Winter, with two well advanced young. I’d be betting these were the same birds we photographed in the area last year.    One of the adults adjusted to my presence in a few minutes and continued to feed and preen quite closely. Then it (she?) sat down on the ground a few metres away and “sun-hazed” and quite went into a trance.    Satisfied I was no danger, it allowed some fine portraits to be made.

And the I heard the wheezy call of a Diamond Firetail watching the portrait session.

As we started for home we came across the White-browed Woodswallows feeding some young, and then a family of  Brown Treecreepers looking after their growing juveniles.

Of course no trip to Eynesbury would be complete without a sighting of the elusive Speckled Warbler, and to both our delights one flew by as we walked back to the car, and then began to feed on the small slope nearby.  No close approaches with this bird, so my score of great photos of  this little dude is still intact. Zero.

Enjoy

_DWJ5206
Jacky WInter
_DWJ5088
Jacky WInter Juvenile
_DWJ5101
Thanks for the food Mum!
_DWJ5154
Tree Martin
_DWJ5226
Jacky WInter,Juvenile
_DWJ5252
White-browed Woodswallow, fledgling
Diamond Firetail
Diamond Firetail
_DWJ5287
Brown Treecreeper
_DWJ5273
Speckled Warbler