Well, are you feeling lucky Punk? Go ahead make my day!

DJ's Birds as Poetry

EE, Mr An Onymous and I have been taken trips down to the Western Treatment Plant looking for the Elusive White-bellied Sea-eagle.  A trip that would make Sir Percivale, of The Grail story, quiver in fear. And so far we’ve been about as successful.

Only made worse by me ‘mate’ Neil phoning and telling me, “Oh, saw the Sea-eagle again today, blah blah…..”

On this trip we were on the way back up along the Little River road heading home, when across the river I spied movement just about the fence line.
A Spotted Harrier quoth I.  Now of course, truth be told, I’ve not got a very good track record on identifying said Harriers.  Seem to either get them confused with Black or Whistling Kites or on other occasions with their close cousin the Swamp. Emails aplenty from those who do know can testify to my tardiness on this id…

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On a wing and a….

DJ's Birds as Poetry

As I needed to go do a medical thing near the Point Cook Coastal Park, the thought came up, that we could go photograph Flame Robins (astute reader that you are, you’ll have noted that the positive side of that is – not look for robins to photograph- Well noted)

As it turned out the sunshine came out and EE found an really interesting pair of Black Kites, interesting in that they were both ‘very’ interested in one another.  One, which we concluded to be the male, kept sweeping into the perching tree carrying things to ‘offer’.  She on the other hand kept encouraging him, and eventually they stopped to mate.  EE has those shots. (Of course).

We decided that little hard to get close to red robins, were no match for the the challenge of two eager Black Kites and walked around to a gateway, and entered the paddock…

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Enjoying the early sunshine at the Western Treatment Plant

DJ's Birds as Poetry

Tales to be told, but in the end a day at the Treatment plant on a sunny day is always a trip into a ‘magical place’.

We went early to look for Sea-eagles. Truth be told, we didn’t see one but here is a small selection of the lives of a few of the inhabitants for the day.

This little dude is always on the post near the Little River outflow. This little dude is always on the post near the Little River outflow.

Whistling Kite on Approach. Whistling Kite on Approach.

Safe and securely landed. Safe and securely landed.

Time to fold up the big wings Time to fold up the big wings

That early morning sunshine gives a richness to the wing markings That early morning sunshine gives a richness to the wing markings

I'm always impressed to see how they can turn and keep the head horizontal. Great presence. I’m always impressed to see how they can turn and keep the head horizontal. Great presence.

My Mate Rodger does the best Swallow inflight. Me, its all a learning experience My Mate Rodger does the best Swallow inflight. Me, its all a learning experience

The ultimate in takeaway. This Whistling Kite has secured the internal organs from a Black Swan carcass (probably a fox kill) The ultimate in takeaway.
This Whistling Kite has secured the internal organs from a Black Swan carcass (probably a fox kill)

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Werribee Wagtails at Melton on a weather challenged day

DJ's Birds as Poetry

Werribee Wagtails bus day out was a trip to several  Melton Parks.  Geraldine and Brian had worked out some good spots, and it was all looking well until the weather took a turn for the worse (which is dear reader, a euphemism for went belly up big time)

What with the incessant rain, the chilling squally winds and little real shelter, it meant. Stay in car, or put on Drizabone. Of which I settled for the latter.

Besides not only wanted to see birds, but had a new lens to try out, and after taking fodoze of the inside moisture of the car, it was obviously time to get out.  As luck would have it the rain eased and we could walk around the Caroline Springs water feature without having to paddle through a water feature on the footpath.

Morning tea at Melton Hannah Watts Park, and then a stroll around…

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2015: The boys are back in town

I used that heading a couple of years back to announce the arrival in the Woodlands Backpaddock of  a family group of Flame Robins with three  males that hunted closely together.  They have been over the past 4 or 5 years very consistent in their wintering over at Woodlands.

So much so that I’ve named them collectively, “The Three Brothers”

Well, they are are back. Roll the Thin Lizzy, Boys are Back in Town, sound track. (Play it loud).

We passed through the hallowed gates today and within about 5 minutes had located a fast moving flock. Perhaps 8-10 birds, a good number of Thornbills, and a Golden Whistler pair, and the usual fantails and wagtail outriders.

Here is Mr Red-slash.   He has a particularly long red bib, goes much further up his neckline that normal.

Not the best image I’ve ever made of him, but given the degree of difficulty I’m pretty happy.  More to follow I expect.

DWJ-1505-01-_DWJ6561

Even though he's much further away, and I've had to nail a big crop, you can see his wider turn on the red chest feathers.  Besides he has a much more imposing look in this one.  I think, if it works that way, that he is the dominant male. The others always seem to take cue from him.
Even though he’s much further away, and I’ve had to nail a big crop, you can see his wider turn on the red chest feathers. Besides he has a much more imposing look in this one.
I think, if it works that way, that he is the dominant male. The others always seem to take cue from him.