From the Field Notes Book: Feeding your Hobby

The weather has not been conducive to keeping tabs on the local Hobby Nursery.
We have also the challenge of the location, as its quite a busy carpark, and Security offers its own challenges. Carparks are not public spaces.
The second challege to in-flight photography is the trees are all very well established Sugar Gums, with a few Umbrella Pine, and all quite tall, and of course close together. So its hard to get an open shot of in-flight activity.

But persist we shall.

Early mornings seem to be the best. Quiet carpark, security having breakfast and the like. And if the light is right then its a bonus.

Here is a few from a couple of feeding cycles the other day.

Dad arrives with a breakfast offering. Unlike Black-shouldered Kites, he doesn't seem to have the ability to hover. Rather he pulls up in a climb and then for a few seconds holds station before beginning to drop.
Dad arrives with a breakfast offering. Unlike Black-shouldered Kites, he doesn’t seem to have the ability to hover. Rather he pulls up in a climb and then for a few seconds holds station before beginning to drop.
Hold on. I'm comin'
Hold on. I’m comin’
Me too
Me too
Hard to see in these shots, but one of them is quite a bit larger than the other. So I'm tipping its a male and a female.
Hard to see in these shots, but one of them is quite a bit larger than the other. So I’m tipping it’s a male and a female.
I'm also sure everybody knows who's turn it is for the food. I don't think its a case of first in.
I’m also sure everybody knows who’s turn it is for the food. I don’t think its a case of first in.
I think this might be my Nat Geo Shot.
Dropping away,
Needing to find a suitable perch to hold the prey while it eats.
That might work.
Which leaves the other one to hone up its flying skills. They have already learned to take dragonflies in the air.
A great look at the outstretch as it takes off
Graining speed and height
Dad arrives with a new meal. This time he takes the safe approach and delivers onto a branch
All secure and away

That’s it for the year.

Enjoy your festive season and may 2023 bring some fantastic picture opportunities to your lens.


See you in 2023 Along the Track

12 thoughts on “From the Field Notes Book: Feeding your Hobby

  1. A fantastic series of images, David!
    Yes, that is a difficult location to work in.
    Great to view and enjoy!
    Wishing you and EE a Happy Christmas and all the best for 2023!
    Perhaps the weather will be better and a few more of our feathered friends around!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Eleanor, I think much of the problem is how one is logged into WP. I can comment on some sites and others no matter how much I try it never is successful.

      I’d like to think we were able to do this sort of work on a regular basis, but this day was one when it all came together for just a short time.

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  2. What a beautiful and comprehensive case study in picture form of these birds David, and the photos are par excellent ! We can see from these shots how important their beautiful tail is in helping them maneuver and land. It was great that you had mainly clear sky for these, and good light.

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  3. Hello Ashley, it has been quite an experience working with this pair. They are behaving very differently to last year. Perhaps its because there are only two to feed, or the weather, or even the availability of food. (Mostly Fairy Martins so far),
    So its been much more a challenge. Add to that the weather, the parking and Security. If there was another way of accessing the area I would go that way, but the floods have closed up two roads.

    Being super fast, they quickly fly from one end of the area to another and its really only a bit of luck if the action all goes off close to where we’re standing.
    All good fun, and of course in a week or two, they’ll be gone for another season.

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  4. This is awesome and the whole illustrated story worth NatGeo publication, David. The shots are so clear and packed with action they make my heart beat faster when I go through then again and again. Hats off!

    Like

  5. I had to return for my dose of arenaline this cloudy morning. This breathtaking documentary deserves to be published in some good nature magazine/s. I’m glad it’s still here to be accessed but how many people know about it? Thanks again for sharing, David.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello Adam, glad you dropped by. I guess, that its a pretty small audience. I share a bit like sitting around a table with friends discussing the day’s activities.
      Don’t know how I’d turn it into a broader audience without going to the more aggressive social media.

      Like

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