Little Visits: The Steady Procession

Having found our needle in the haystack, we made plans to visit regularly to see how things were progressing.

Because of the situation of the tree in question, it kind of determined an early morning start. Which in hindsight turned out to have several advantages. And of course the obvious dis. Getting up and rolling just after sunup.  Daylight saving is never high on my must have lists. As early starts have one other dis.  The day becomes very long.  Good excuse for a ‘nanna nap,’ I hear you cry. 🙂

The general layout of the area helped a lot too.  Kingfishers are pretty fussy about location, so there were several branches that became favoured perches for checking things out before delivering food, and also to get the right angle of attack to sweep into the nest, deposit the food and depart.

The average person in the bush would not notice ‘corridors’ through the trees, but no so Kingfishers.  It took us several visits to work out where they were coming from, and so could be prepared, and where, on leaving, they were disappearing to.

While they were still sitting eggs, the food visits were around the hour or so, usually a little longer. Once the young were hatched, the time between appearances was within 20 minutes or so.  Both adults were involved in the feeding.

Here is a selection from that first couple of weeks.  It was interesting to note that food sources were varied. After cleaning out the skinks, they moved on to centipedes and the like, and occasionally some aquatic fare as well.