Surprise! A Hobby at the Office

Hope you survived the little tirade in the last post. All is forgiven.

EE and I thought, based on the last couple of adventures to The Office, that we needed to make a quick looksee if the Black-shouldered Kites had settled.
Many will remember Kitty and Kalev (The Brave), and their nesting attempts over the last couple of seasons.
They are fairly tolerant, and as she makes some of the best, most secretive nests, the chances of interrupting her on nest are pretty slim. And he has no problems about bringing mice in for her virtually above our sit spot.

So it was with a bit of an expectant parent  looksee, that we turned up on a mostly cloudy day and looked around the carpark. And there they were, clever pair, way down the range, and out of camera reach.

“Perhaps he’ll come over to hunt along the river edge,” says she. So we meandered on along the river bank.

DWJ_2972.jpg

Continue reading “Surprise! A Hobby at the Office”

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Why I wonder, do we have to talk about Ethics?

Not much of a subject really in a bird blog.  Is it?

For quite awhile I’ve had a disclaimer on this blog of our birding practice(s).

I’ve been challenged, (accused is too strong a word-but you have to sit in my seat to appreciate the difference), that we (EE and I) take ‘liberties’ with the birds we photograph.

Here is the summary of what I’ve said previously.

Addendum: Just to be very clear.  These birds are not baited, called in, or in anyway interfered with.   We don’t use: hides, camo gear nor setup stations.  We mostly sit, and work for acceptance. We are simply recording the activities of a very relaxed and completely confident bird.  We strive for connection and if a bird exhibits any ‘stress’, we leave it in peace.  No photo is worth stressing the bird.
Now you know!

Long term readers will be familiar with my quotes from Jon Young’s “What the Robin Knows!”.  Short version   Jon Young strives for and encourages “Connectedness”.
“One day I will see a bird and a thin thread will form between me and the bird. If I just see it and don’t recognise it, no thread is formed.  If I go again and again, the thread is strengthened each time. It will eventually grow in to a string, then a cord, then a rope. This is what it means to be a Bushman, we make ropes of connection to all aspects of the creation” Introduction, page xxv.

We strive to keep that connectedness, in some very special instances the birds respond in a most enchanting way.  For those, we are able to raise great stories.

Brad Hill, is a Canadian photographer, and I follow his work regularly.

He has posted recently posted a timely  “Code of Ethics for Bird Photographers”. Thought you might like a different perspective.  See it here  http://www.naturalart.ca/voice/photography_ethics.html

 

Oh, and here is a bird that had developed connectedness with me.
Her name was Primrose.  A lovely female Red-capped Robin at Woodlands. Most days as we walked past, she would deliberately come out for a visit.

Red-capped Robin
How close can you get? Now turn to the right, work it, work it.

The header photo is from the Kestrel Series and there are several blog posts back a year or two about that extended moment.  Her name was Elizabeth— Jane Austin fans will understand.

Keep takin’ photos.  We do.