Why I wonder, do we have to talk about Ethics?

Not much of a subject really in a bird blog.  Is it?

For quite awhile I’ve had a disclaimer on this blog of our birding practice(s).

I’ve been challenged, (accused is too strong a word-but you have to sit in my seat to appreciate the difference), that we (EE and I) take ‘liberties’ with the birds we photograph.

Here is the summary of what I’ve said previously.

Addendum: Just to be very clear.  These birds are not baited, called in, or in anyway interfered with.   We don’t use: hides, camo gear nor setup stations.  We mostly sit, and work for acceptance. We are simply recording the activities of a very relaxed and completely confident bird.  We strive for connection and if a bird exhibits any ‘stress’, we leave it in peace.  No photo is worth stressing the bird.
Now you know!

Long term readers will be familiar with my quotes from Jon Young’s “What the Robin Knows!”.  Short version   Jon Young strives for and encourages “Connectedness”.
“One day I will see a bird and a thin thread will form between me and the bird. If I just see it and don’t recognise it, no thread is formed.  If I go again and again, the thread is strengthened each time. It will eventually grow in to a string, then a cord, then a rope. This is what it means to be a Bushman, we make ropes of connection to all aspects of the creation” Introduction, page xxv.

We strive to keep that connectedness, in some very special instances the birds respond in a most enchanting way.  For those, we are able to raise great stories.

Brad Hill, is a Canadian photographer, and I follow his work regularly.

He has posted recently posted a timely  “Code of Ethics for Bird Photographers”. Thought you might like a different perspective.  See it here  http://www.naturalart.ca/voice/photography_ethics.html

 

Oh, and here is a bird that had developed connectedness with me.
Her name was Primrose.  A lovely female Red-capped Robin at Woodlands. Most days as we walked past, she would deliberately come out for a visit.

Red-capped Robin
How close can you get? Now turn to the right, work it, work it.

The header photo is from the Kestrel Series and there are several blog posts back a year or two about that extended moment.  Her name was Elizabeth— Jane Austin fans will understand.

Keep takin’ photos.  We do.

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In the School with Choughs

Flow with whatever may happen 
and let your mind be free. 
Stay centered by accepting 
whatever you are doing. 
This is the ultimate. 
Chuang Tzu

 

We’d been sitting quietly for awhile. Infact long enough to enjoy at least one cuppa and think longingly for the Thermos for a second.

It’s the You Yangs. Near the old, now unused, Duckponds School building. We were making one last session at finding the Jacky Winter pair and to see what the Eastern Yellow Robins were up to.
And.
To tell all the truth.  Not much.  Yep, that’s it. Little, a void, devoid, uninhabited. Departed, moved on, relocated.

And its been like that for quite awhiles. Many of the more productive spots we’ve been visiting, have been, well, decidedly UNproductive.

I knew there were White-winged Choughs on the other side of the main road, as their calls were quite clear.

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Continue reading “In the School with Choughs”

Purple-crowned Lorikeet: The Art of the Impossible

“Forget the years, forget distinctions. 
Leap into the boundless and make it your home!”
― Zhuangzi

 

Here’s a quick one as I’m still smiling after watching it happen

Take two Purple-crowned Lorikeets in preening mode.  Have one of them decide that its more fun on the other side of the branch.
Imagine (if you will), it can fly across to the new spot.

But.

Our hero of the moment takes a much  more direct approach.  Had I but known this would have been so much more fun to see in video.

Enjoy

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Nothing like a preen and a wingstretch to build a pair bond

Continue reading “Purple-crowned Lorikeet: The Art of the Impossible”

Inside the World of Bee-eaters

	“The wise man knows that it is better 
	to sit on the banks of a remote mountain stream 
	than to be emperor of the whole world.” 
	― Zhuangzi

One bird that is somewhat elusive and challenges us to keep going out to find new areas is the Rainbow Bee-eater.

We’ve been known to drive to Newstead, and sit quietly on the creek bank that runs through the cemetery as its usually a honey-pot area for them during nesting season.   Of course the opportunity for a pie at the Guildford General Store might have something to do with that journey as well.
The You Yangs Park is also a well known area for them, although the nesting there is generally on private property and access is a bit more difficult.  We also see them at Mt Rothwell Conservation Area, and no doubt they nest there, but it’s also not an easy access to organise.

Continue reading “Inside the World of Bee-eaters”

Office Addendum

Given our somewhat fling of success the previous evening, EE decided that an early morning start to have a look and see if we could locate the Nankeen Night-herons and Sacred Kingfishers would be a good use of our time.  And as my poor old foot had survived the first outing, it might be good of course, to well, test it a bit further. Thanks.  Such is the medical profession. Of which EE is not one. 🙂

It did seem quite bright sunshine and blue sky as we loaded Sir Perceval, and head out.  But as soon as we were past the halfway point, the clouds rolled in, and was that rain I detected on the windscreen.  “Oh, Jane said on the telly news that it wouldn’t rain today”, she confidently replies.
Oh! Good!

It seems to me, and I might of course be speaking out of turn, but the weather tv folk must always be talking about a specific house in a specific (unspecified of course) neighborhood, and the rest of us can just take pot luck.  I’m also of the opinion, and I could of course be speaking out of turn again, but it seems to me, that said weather spruikers are probably less accurate than the other dudes who do the ‘Your day by the Stars’, readings— Just sayin’.

Highlight of the day was two Wedge-tailed Eagles either in dispute or play. Regrettably little sunshine and too far far away.  But an amazing sight. Continue reading “Office Addendum”